The Naval Engineering Test Establishment receives some upgrades

Renovations that began over a year ago are nearing completion at the Naval Engineering Test Establishment (NETE), located in the Borough of Lasalle, Montreal. The NETE, which has operated continuously since 1953, will soon have some brand new spaces, just in time for the new year. In recent months, this building, which is used to test equipment for the Canadian Armed Forces, has seen two of its wings completely demolished in order to make way for construction of newer, more modern ones.

"Technology has evolved a lot in recent years, and the structures were no longer meeting market standards and needs," said Jean-François Simard, DCC Coordinator, Construction Services. The new steel and concrete structure will replace the former, wooden one, which was no longer meeting requirements. The two replaced wings were over 50 years old. They are being replaced by more modern wings that can accommodate sophisticated equipment—a reflection of technology's progress in recent years, particularly in the field of computer science.

The project was initially scheduled to span 21 months, but in the end, it will be completed within just 15 months, thanks to the contractor's vision. The contractor able to completely revamp the timetable, which has generated substantial savings in time and cost.

DCC will be completing the east wing in early December 2016, while work on the west wing will be finished in late December 2016, drawing the project to a close by the end of the month.


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In our past issues

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